top of page

Our Webinar:  Are "privilege" and "unconscious bias" the two most controversial terms in the world of ED&I?

We talked a lot in our recent webinar about how one of the huge perks of having an element of privilege is the ability to be a terrific ally. And one of the parts of being a great ally is “doing the work” to educate yourself about the experiences of other people.

 

So in that spirit, here’s our “starter for ten” reading, watching the following list to help educate yourself on privilege and bias:

Privilege - the basics

Peggy McIntosh first coined the term “White Privilege” in the 80s.

 

Read, watch or listen to anything with Reni Eddo-Lodge. Her book “Why I’m no Longer Talking to White People about Race” is an incredible foray into the history of race in the UK, providing a blend of historical context and personal experience. We’re always clear that everyone should read the whole book, and you definitely should!

 

This lovely snappy definition of “privilege” from the wonderful John Amaechi.

 

We also highly recommend Layla Saad’s book “Me and White Supremacy” - this book is for folks who are ready and willing to do the work - of understanding how structural racism benefits any of us with white skin. It’s a challenging read, but really well worth it. 

Popcorn Movie
Image by Kimberly Farmer

Unconcious bias

Our favourite book on the subject is Howard Ross’s “Everyday Bias” - it blends a mix of the theory of bias with the author’s own anecdotes and life experiences. It’s a lovely accessible read to help you understand the topic. 

 

There’s a great podcast on Audible right now - Derren Brown’s Bootcamp for the brain which explores all the little ways our brain shortcuts. It’s a great, easily digestible foray into the ways biases manifest in day-to-day life.

Educate yourself

We think that one of the best ways to educate yourself on other people’s perspectives and experiences is just to read or listen to something different. Here are some of our recommendations: 

 

The beautiful series “It’s a sin” is still available on All Four - it’s Russell T Davis’s dramatisation of the AIDs crisis in the 1980s. 

 

 

“If you don’t know” - a fantastic podcast, available on BBC iplayer, a dedicated space for black conversation - going deeper on the topics that matter.

 

Image by Juja Han
Image by Ian Schneider

Social Media

We’re really fond of following a whole bunch of different folks on social channels - as our Julie is fond of saying, it gives you a snapshot into someone’s life and experience on their own terms.

 

Some of our faves on insta are: 

 

@drhannahbarhambrown - disability, LGBTQ+ campaigner

@blairimani - Founder of Smarter in Seconds 

@everydayracism_ - Anti-racist authors 

 

Twitter 

 

You should definitely follow our own amazing @cherylmorgan - an expert on VERY many things, including trans history, SciFi and cricket.

bottom of page